Pildappa Rock – Tcharkuldu Rock

Continuing my travels around Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, I made a point to stop at Pildappa Rock.   which is an easy drive out of Minnipa. On previous trips to the Peninsula, I’ve explored some of the other granite outcrops and was keen to see more.

As a side note, this Wiki entry states “The Nauo were the indigenous people of the area of Minnipa before they became extinct. ”   To me, that’s a different way of saying until they were massacred by the white settlers. …….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The dirt road was in fairly good condition, otherwise I’d not have put my old van on it due to often rough corrugations.  In the distance can be seen the Gawler Ranges, a place I’d love to visit, however, pets are not allowed and an off-road vehicle is required.  One day perhaps….. You can read more about the Ranges on this traveller’s account. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

An enticing view of what was to come.  Due to my longer than anticipated stopover in Kyancutta, I didn’t arrive here until about midday.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Don’t be fooled, I took this shot later in the afternoon 🙂

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So in we went…..

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We were grateful for the shade to take the sting out of the midday temperatures.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We took the track around the rock to a quiet camp site on the other side.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Then we rested until late afternoon when it was time for a little walk.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Others visiting climbed onto the top, but I respect these sites too much to do that.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Early next morning, the moon added to the atmosphere.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It was quite chilly overnight and we watched for the first rays of the sun to appear.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After a quick cuppa, I was off exploring.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is a view of farmland opposite the Rock and you can see how flat it is.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The track around made for easy walking.  It was soooo peaceful 🙂

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Those hollows collect water, and then overflow down the sides.  Love to see that!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Always interesting to see who else is about.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The sun was slowly warming up the area.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Very very old lichen on the surfaces.  I’m still working on finding out more about them.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I became fanciful, and thought this was like a turtle.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here’s a platypus:-)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Another cutie.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The water would pour down this groove, during rain, what a sight to see!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

At the base of the rock, a small fence has been built, to trap and divert the water for use by the settlers.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

By this stage, I’m almost finished circling it, back to the point where I entered the day before.  The campers I heard but never sighted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This one at the end reminded me of a scone….. perhaps I was getting hungry by this stage.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It was back to the van for a quick breakfast, and then off to explore further.  It is certainly an area I’ll be wanting to come back to in different seasons, to see more of the wildflowers, and the rock in different light.  It was peaceful and not crowded with too many other campers, just my sort of place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special K – not the cereal

During my recent travels in Eyre Peninsula, I visited two towns starting with K.  First one was Kimba, which I passed through late in the afternoon.  I’ve stayed in Kimba in the past, and did check out their camping area on the outskirts of town, but it was a little too crowded for my liking.  It was interesting to see that it has expanded it’s capacity to cater for visitors, no doubt through some recent funds the community has received from those who intend to use Kimba as a repository for a nuclear waste dump.  I call it bribe money. And it’s an issue that has divided the town.  There’s been a vote, in the affirmative, but the issue is still not settled.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For those who are into “big” things, there is a giant galah in Kimba, and it also has silo art right in the centre of town.

That night we camped further along the highway, west of the town, in a little pull off the road, just down from a formal sealed area.  We prefer being in our own undisturbed space.  🙂

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There was some noise from large trucks, but not too bad.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There was a little patch of native scrub on the edge of the farmed paddock, and Pixel enjoyed checking it out in the early morning light.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As always, nice to see the sunrise.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This little native plant was flowering nearby.  It’s a type of fan flower (scaevola) but I’ve not checked which one specifically.  I just like it.  Mind you, at first glance at the bush, you could miss the small flowers….. as it can be with many Australian natives, you need to look closer to see their beauty.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Our next stop was Kyancutta. The sign on the highway on the outskirts is what drew me in – it advertised good quality coffee!  It was still fairly early in the morning and I was looking forward to a boost 🙂

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kyancutta is predominately cereal growing country, and the early settlers certainly had a hard time opening up the land to farming.  While I think the time has come to change the thinking on farming in this manner, I do commend them on their efforts.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The only store in town.   But what a great place to stop!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clean albeit small and basic toilets.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Distances…..

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Inside the shop, the interior view is quite appealing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A vital service in these little communities is the local postal agency.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I proceeded to order a coffee, and had a wander around while waiting.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The menu was interesting, and a nice change from the basic fryups often seen in these stopovers.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Quirky light fittings added to the charm of the place.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I ended up sitting in the booth by the window.  Love those old booths.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Along one wall is a small but interesting section on local history.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

An early “smart ” phone system 🙂

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sean and his wife Vanessa run this place, and we had a great connection.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

They have moved from Melbourne city to the back blocks of South Australia, with their three children, to experience a slower life than the city pace.

Here’s a bit of the story. 

Truly, the coffee lived up to it’s advertising of barista quality, it was superb! I also took away lunch of baked pumpkin and goodies, which was delicious.  Good food is not always easy to find in these areas, and it was a delight and surprise to find it here.

I definitely highly recommend stopping here when travelling across the region.

 

Fergie

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Ferguson TE 20 tractor is commemorated in the NSW town of Wentworth, for the part it played in saving the town from the epic 1956 floods.  The world’s first monument to a tractor was erected in town and sits on a cairn at the height of the water that would have inundated the town had the clay levee banks not been put in place.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I confess I love these little tractors, which were so commonplace on small rural holdings, and a far cry from the monsters of today.  Many Australian children learned to drive on a Fergie.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I was disappointed to miss the Tractor Trek which took place in the Flinders Ranges in August 2019.  Ironically that was the time when I was in NSW and around Wentworth. It wouldn’t surprise me if some of those taking part had a childhood connection with these machines.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It appears also, Fergie has appeal around the world, judging from the popularity of this!

Naturally, I have to put in an Australian song about little Fergie…....

As a child I could remember my parents on occasions referring to the 1956 floods, even though they weren’t directly affected, living in Adelaide at the time.  In my travels at various times, I come across towns with markers showing the height the flood waters reached, and it’s very sobering to consider how it would have affected so many towns and people and creatures.

Today, at the end of Spring, it seems half of Australia is burning.  Terrible bush fires.

Blaze Aid is a volunteer organisation helping communities to rebuild after natural disasters.  It commenced after the terrible Black Saturday fires in 2009,  and now responds to situations in which communities have been affected.

Communities are affected in ways not dissimilar to floods, and watching this wonderful record of events on Youtube, and the way people rallied together, it’s not all bad.  Let’s remember that people can unite still.  It’s not all about might, but about the mighty spirit, just like Fergie.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

No No No No Nuclear in Australia!

“Nuclear power, apart from nuclear war, is the greatest medical threat posed to life on this planet.”

Helen Caldicott anti-nuclear activist

Back in the early 1980’s I first read Dr. Helen Caldicott’s book “Nuclear Madness”.  At the time I was living in the Northern Flinders Ranges, and knew of uranium in the Ranges, and plans to mine it.  I was incensed.  Nothing has changed my view over the decades.

Then in the mid 2000’s,  when I was living in the Mid-North of South Australia, I was fortunate to  be able to attend a meeting where Dr. Caldicott was guest speaker.  She was visiting family in the region, and was generous enough to speak at a local meeting, otherwise it’s unlikely there would have been the opportunity to listen to her in person.

Now I find myself as a regular visitor to the Flinders Ranges, confronted by government plans to install a nuclear dump in the geologically unstable region.  Kimba, on Eyre Peninsula’s grain producing region is another site being considered.  It’s a war that the locals are fighting against misinformation and blatant lies lies and more damn lies.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Last month I attended a nuclear protest meeting in Port Augusta.  I’ll do a larger post on that later, but for now here’s a link to a recent article by Dr. Caldicott on thorium reactors.  The Delusion of Thorium by Dr. Helen Caldicott

Physicians for Social Responsibility  

At the 2019 Visionary Leaders Award Ceremony, Dr. Caldicott will receive her Lifetime Achievement Award for her dedicated service.  Read an interview with her here.

Sadly, there is still a need for Dr. Caldicott’s work to continue. Here’s an article by her on Small Modular Reactors.

Let’s not give up the fight to save this planet from the greed of psychopaths.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

More of Dr. Caldicott’s books can be found on Amazon.