my view of the natural world


Cape Bridgewater

With a beautiful bay with plenty of sand, birds, and few people, Cape Bridgewater was the destination for Fred and I recently when we had some spare time on our hands and paws.  It was a little too cold that day for dipping into the water, but it was lovely to finally walk along some sand as my local coastline has only tiny sections on which to walk.


The Race that Stops a Nation – Melbourne Cup!

History has been made today – a female jockey has won Australia’s most prestigious horse race, the Melbourne Cup.

Congratulations to Michelle Payne who has today ridden the winner of the 2015 Cup – Prince of Penzance.

Women are still highly discriminated against in this male dominated field, and that makes her success even more special!

Linking MCS and Autism


I’ve just finished reading Dr. Molot’s book, and thoroughly recommend that everyone one reads it, whether they think they are affected by MCS or not. I’ve been a canary for over a decade now, and would never wish for anyone to have to go through this experience. Let’s clean up this world for the future generations!

Originally posted on John Molot:


Young women need to listen to the canaries

I’m in my 60s now, ten years into my second marriage, and my wife and I have six children between us. We are at a stage in life when our children are having babies and our friends and relatives of the same age are also becoming grandparents.  When we hear the exciting news – that we’re expecting a new grandchild – the combined feeling of joy and excitement is hard to describe, which helps to suppress the unspeakable worry; that the baby might be born with less than good health. And we have good reason for concern, because developmental disorders now affect one in six children.

Conditions like autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affect almost 2% of children, which is 8 times higher than in the 90’s. Look at the following graph. What’s going on?


Some people blame the increase in ASD…

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The Circle of Life

When I was a little girl, I learned to play the piano – a bit.  My true musical love was the violin.  One day the violin came to me, and decades later, we are still together.  However, after the first few years, it took a backseat to my love of horses, and was unplayed for a long time.  Horses could remove me from my environment as music could not do, and so it was ……  then a few years ago, a mandolin came to me.  Mandolin and violin are tuned the same, and I have to say, it was love at first sight when I happened upon it. So the mandolin and the horse co-existed for a time, as the horse and I took our walks down to the river, where I would sit and play on the river bank, while the horse Sally grazed.

Then we moved………….  and we lost that freedom….   and then Sally got ill…. and then she was gone.

Difficult as it was without her, and without any horse in my life, I made the decision that horses were gone and that music was to come forward again.

It wasn’t that I didn’t like piano music, I do, and in recent times had been playing a little on a friend’s modern Kawai. A lovely piano, yet somehow lacking the ‘soul’ I felt, of an old piano. Talking with a piano tuner, I knew there would be a compromise to be made between an accurate sound from a modern instrument, and having the feel of an old one. But lets face it, I was never going to perform in public, just amuse myself.

I’d had a couple of electronic keyboards over the years, but found them unsatisfactory for anything other than exercising my fingers.  My lifestyle though, of frequently moving house, deemed it not appropriate to get a proper piano.  They are not the smallest or the lightest of instruments to cart about. :-)

However, not long after moving to my current address, I came across an old piano in a Salvation Army Opshop.  It was at a price I could afford, and it included delivery. (They didn’t know I had steps!) I sought advice over the phone, and examined the internals, played it, and even found out it’s recent history.  Yes, it was old and battered, but was playable and had a lovely sound, and would perhaps respond to some TLC and a tuning.  It’s now had some TLC and is awaiting the arrival of the tuner.  Slowly, I’m getting back into it again.  And soon, I hope to pick up the others again.  Stay tuned. :-)




At home


My friends together

Meeting the neighbours

Once again, my apologies for the silence.  Life has of course, been very busy, and at present I’m away from my new home more than I’m in it.  Soon I hope to spend more time settling in, but just at present I’m helping my friend get ready for his new gallery opening – and there’s a mountain of work to be done!  Fred and the cats consider themselves with two homes :-)

When we are at the beach house, some of the time we can talk to the neighbours over the back fence…..


The boys meet the neighbours


Meeting Jenny


Pixel meets Jenny

Then of course, there’s the view from the front of the house…..


A birds eye view


Making a splash

And inside the house, is my latest acquisition……



I am thrilled with my new but very old piano.  Like me, it’s seen better days, but it has more soul than the modern boxes as far as I’m concerned, and is fine for my humble hands.  Much better than the electronic keyboard too!  My friend who is used to playing a grand piano thinks it has a sweet tone :-)

Here’s a shot of the Spring Garden I’m working on at present – just bursting into life isn’t it!


Gnome sweet gnome

More soon xx

At the end of the exploring…… I have arrived……


We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.

 T. S. Eliot

For the past several months I have been back and forth between S.A. and S.W. Victoria – the cats now regard their travelling boxes as their second home :-)  Fred of course, like most dogs, simply loves being in the car and on the road.

It has been a time of great adjustments as I have spent most of the past seven years living more as a hermit than a social person, and I faced challenges to keeping my balance – and more than once overbalanced and fell down.  However, I kept plugging away, knowing it was time for me to change my way of living and once on that path, I couldn’t turn back.  It was a lot of fun helping my friend settle into his new house and in meeting very many friendly musicans and artists and others.  Eventually though, I needed my own place, and after much searching, I have found something that satisfies many of my requirements.  So I’m swapping  paddocks for the ocean and instead seeing cows I’m hoping to see whales!  My next place is a small cottage with the coast just across the road, and I can see the ocean from my front room.  It’s not quite suburbia, and not quite country – I do have a little space around me thankfully.  It’s not perfect, but it’s a start and feels the right step to take at the right time.  There’s a great community of artists in the area, and Irish music also – high on my list is getting back to playing my own selection of instruments on a more regular basis.

All this week I’ve been back at the farm cottage, packing up and readying for the BIG MOVE!  It’s about 250 kms away and generally a nice drive, although as usual, it has areas heavily populated by kangaroos, so I avoid travelling from dusk to dawn. So it’s a busy time, but once I’ve settled into the new abode, I’ll put up some images of my new local environment.

Here’s a little taste though….


Just before Easter, while back at the farm after an absence, Fred decided to take on an old man kangaroo that was living quietly in the small back paddock near the house.  Damn terriers never know when to give up!  I felt very sorry for the kangaroo, and it was a very tricky situation to get Fred away from it while still staying safe myself……  Finally though, I managed to grab Fred literally from the arms of the roo as it choked the life out of him.  Tough little bloke that he is, after a trip to the vet and treatment, he bounced back very quickly.  It took me a little longer….  but it has given us a good story to tell :-)

I’ve been told that a koala perodically visits the gum tree near the back door of the beach house – Fred had better leave that one alone!  So stay tuned for hopefully some images of the local wildlife.  Koalas are actually often visitors to the main street in Portland, and the locals take great care to avoid them on the roads.  I’m just waiting to see one waltzing across the zebra crossing :-)

Unfortunately Mr. Merriweather can’t be making the trip with us, and several weeks ago he went off to live with the creatures he feels most at home with – the cattle.  He taught me a great deal in the time we were together, and won’t be forgotten.


At home.

So yet again change is upon us.  Please forgive me for not posting much in recent months, but I promise I’ll get back to my regular updates sometime next month :-)

Can smart meters cause house fires?

Originally posted on Stop Smart Meters Australia:

burned meter removedIn yet another recent house fire, the electricity distributor, as usual, wasted no time in racing to the scene to remove the burned out smart meter. What’s the rush?

Gee, I’m sure the property owner is very grateful to the distributor for being so quick off the mark to remove that potentially dangerous smart meter. They wouldn’t want the meter left there to go up in flames yet again, would they?

And I’ll bet the fire investigators are pleased to be spared the effort of investigating one of the possible causes of the fire, now that the evidence has been hastily removed.  It can be tricky to get your mind around how those high tech electrical devices connected to old wiring can cause fires.

Just as well the house is now uninhabitable and doesn’t need electricity supply. I suppose it would take a lot longer to get a meter installed…

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