A Peak Experience

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One of the small towns I visited on Eyre Peninsula is Darke Peak.  The town, like many others, has been renamed from it’s original name.  In this case it was proclaimed Carappee (a place of water) in 1914, then in 1940 it was changed to Darke Peak after John Charles Darke, the first European who explored the area in 1844.

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Typical farming country, of sheep and cereal with the grain silos dominating the townscape.

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Well, apart from the Hotel.  At one time, it recorded the highest SA beer consumption per population ratio – aussies who take their beer drinking seriously!

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Not so serious, are the hi-jinks the locals have got up to……the first Hellbent hotel was talked of on New Years Eve 1979 so that the drinkers would have another place to go to once they were kicked out of the Pub at closing time…. and by daylight 1980 the first new hotel was finished.

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While planning the Legends Weekend for October 2009, it was decided to rebuild the Hellbent Hotel in honour of the occasion, and here it stands today.  A typical example of what a mob of blokes can get up to out bush 🙂

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The population of Darke Peak is about 50 people.

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A big attraction to the area is the highest point on Eyre Peninsula, Carappee Hill (495 metres) and Carappee Hill Conservation Park.  The Park also has a camping ground with bush trails and toilets.  Sadly, due to my four-legged mates, I can’t go to these places.

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It is a sealed road from the Birdseye Highway turnoff at Rudall, and past the township is a well maintained dirt road, with not too many corrugations – unlike some others we took!

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Travels across Eyre

I’ve just returned from 6 days travel across Eyre Peninsula,  South Australia, and it’s going to take me ages to go through the hundreds of photos I took of this diverse region!  However, here’s a few links for you to look at, to whet your appetite.

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Eyre Peninsula was named after Edward John Eyre, an early English explorer of Australia.  In my travels I came across some places he’d visited, and I really liked the sculptural pieces at Kimba, particularly because it recognised his Aboriginal companion Wylie.

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More on this interesting man Here, and Here, and Here, and Here.

Eyre Peninsula is a large area, and in just a few days I could only visit a small portion of it.  My last trip over there was in the mid 80’s, and was mostly on the lower section, so this time I kept mainly to the upper region, and the beginning of the West Coast.  I found some places I’d enjoy to visit again, for a longer time, and some places I would bypass…..

Venus Bay I adored!

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Fred would be most happy to visit the beaches again and again and again!

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As for the cats, they enjoyed taking some early morning walks with Fred 🙂

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Grace

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“I do not at all understand the mystery of grace–only that it meets us where we are but doesn’t leave us where it found us.”      Anne Lamott

 

A new day beckons

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Last week the weather was quite hot, and the animals and I were glad to have a cool refuge.  However, this week is supposed to be much milder, and so we’re taking advantage of cooler weather to go off adventuring for a few days…..off into the great unknown…. not to my usual places…..and maybe some ocean will arise?  In the meantime, I’ve scheduled some posts, in case I’m unable to access technology.

” Travellers, there is no path, paths are made by walking.”  Antonio Machado