my view of the natural world

It’s a lemon

A lemon is any unexpectedly defective or undesirable thing or person, usually said of bad choices, as in “We picked a lemon when we chose that guy,” or of unsellable cars ( in the motor trade), or new-bought cars that develop mysterious serial problems. To hand someone a lemon is to swindle.  WikiAnswers

My kind neighbour usually keeps me well supplied with lemons from his two trees, but for a short portion of the year, these great trees take a rest and there is no fruit.  So recently, I purchased a few lemons from the supermarket.  I specifically chose Australian grown fruit, to support the local industry, but it seems I really did purchase some  ‘lemons’.

The fruit looked too gorged for my liking, too ‘pumped’ and soft, especially compared to home-grown fruit.  But in my rural area, there’s not a lot of choice when it comes to purchases, so I made my selection.  Yes, the fruit was very juicy, extremely so actually – more than I needed.  I’m used to using one lemon per day – the juice from one half going on my midday meal, and the remainder on my evening meal.   But with these supersized ones, there was sufficient for two days.  Great – except that even under refrigeration the fruit would go bad overnight and become unusable.  Storage of these lemons proved to be a problem also, as they went mouldy very quickly.

Who is to blame?  The consumer for wanting large glossy fruit at the expense of other qualities, or the grower for pushing along their produce with the aim of quick profits?  I don’t know, but it certainly has left a sour taste in my mouth about supporting local growers.

I also this summer purchased from a greengrocer peaches grown in my state.  I love peaches, and have fond memories of biting into sweet soft  juicy flesh of home-grown fruit.  Over the past few years I had given up buying them because I found them all to be hard, tasteless and barely edible, but I was tempted by some and thought I’d give them another  try.  I bought two yellow flesh and two white fleshed fruit.  Once again, disappointment.  They appeared fine, but once again texture and flavour was entirely missing.

Is this the world we live in now?  Where appearances count for more than content?

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4 responses

  1. gini

    re lemons it’s the supermarkets fault ,they demand the size ,type price , colour, they don’t care at all about quailty or taste] from the growers or else no buy….

    January 23, 2010 at 6:24 am

    • eremophila

      Yes I see your point, and yet the consumer can still have an influence by how/what they purchase. Many stone fruits varieties now even when grown correctly in home gardens are still as tasty as cardboard because of the factors in their breeding. I feel that if we went back to purchasing only locally grown products that would change the type of fruit grown, as the flavour would not have to be sacrificed for transportability. Ultimately, it requires a change in individual’s thinking. The 100 Mile Diet is a pretty good place to start.

      January 23, 2010 at 2:21 pm

  2. New Friend

    I just polished off a “Two Day” lemon last night. The used halves were tossed into a bowl of water sitting in the sink. I’ve found that the pulp and pith when soaked soften up and make a good rinse for the finger tips. I wouldn’t have to think twice about adding the contents to a composte if I had one.

    Attempting to put some serious effort into buying organic and local I still find myself reaching for the sales. But if I stop to factor other content, such as the cost of gas for a truck, other employees to package and repackage, the plastic nets and clips…

    I wish I had a tree. I wish I had a yard. But with living in the city…I’ve got a park and credit card.

    February 21, 2010 at 6:34 am

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