my view of the natural world

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Fallen Boys

eremophila:

I am aghast at Australia’s continued collusion with Israel allowing these atrocities to continue. Shame Abbott shame!

Originally posted on CollTales:


Where Children Are
Killed & No One Cares

The original, moving tribute to Ahed Atef Bakr, Zakaria Ahed Bakr, Mohamed Ramez Bakr, and Ismael Mohamed Bakr, ages 8 to 10, killed by Israel’s shells at Gaza, was done by Israeli artist Almir Shiby.
We took the liberty of including the heartbreaking picture of the grief stricken father of one of the boys, taken by Hosam Salem. If nothing is done to stop this carnage, we’re all guilty by association.

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Flowing beards

I recently attended a farm auction and couldn’t help but be reminded of Banjo Patterson’s poem “The Man from Ironbark”. 

The Man from Ironbark by A B Patterson

It was the man from Ironbark who struck the Sydney town,
He wandered over street and park, he wandered up and down.
He loitered here, he loitered there, till he was like to drop,
Until at last in sheer despair he sought a barber’s shop.
`’Ere! shave my beard and whiskers off, I’ll be a man of mark,
I’ll go and do the Sydney toff up home in Ironbark.’

The barber man was small and flash, as barbers mostly are,
He wore a strike-your-fancy sash, he smoked a huge cigar:
He was a humorist of note and keen at repartee,
He laid the odds and kept a `tote’, whatever that may be,
And when he saw our friend arrive, he whispered `Here’s a lark!
Just watch me catch him all alive, this man from Ironbark.’

There were some gilded youths that sat along the barber’s wall,
Their eyes were dull, their heads were flat, they had no brains at all;
To them the barber passed the wink, his dexter eyelid shut,
`I’ll make this bloomin’ yokel think his bloomin’ throat is cut.’
And as he soaped and rubbed it in he made a rude remark:
`I s’pose the flats is pretty green up there in Ironbark.’

A grunt was all reply he got; he shaved the bushman’s chin,
Then made the water boiling hot and dipped the razor in.
He raised his hand, his brow grew black, he paused awhile to gloat,
Then slashed the red-hot razor-back across his victim’s throat;
Upon the newly shaven skin it made a livid mark –
No doubt it fairly took him in — the man from Ironbark.

He fetched a wild up-country yell might wake the dead to hear,
And though his throat, he knew full well, was cut from ear to ear,
He struggled gamely to his feet, and faced the murd’rous foe:
`You’ve done for me! you dog, I’m beat! one hit before I go!
I only wish I had a knife, you blessed murdering shark!
But you’ll remember all your life, the man from Ironbark.’

He lifted up his hairy paw, with one tremendous clout
He landed on the barber’s jaw, and knocked the barber out.
He set to work with tooth and nail, he made the place a wreck;
He grabbed the nearest gilded youth, and tried to break his neck.
And all the while his throat he held to save his vital spark,
And `Murder! Bloody Murder!’ yelled the man from Ironbark.

A peeler man who heard the din came in to see the show;
He tried to run the bushman in, but he refused to go.
And when at last the barber spoke, and said, `’Twas all in fun –
‘Twas just a little harmless joke, a trifle overdone.’
`A joke!’ he cried, `By George, that’s fine; a lively sort of lark;
I’d like to catch that murdering swine some night in Ironbark.’

And now while round the shearing floor the list’ning shearers gape,
He tells the story o’er and o’er, and brags of his escape.
`Them barber chaps what keeps a tote, By George, I’ve had enough,
One tried to cut my bloomin’ throat, but thank the Lord it’s tough.’
And whether he’s believed or no, there’s one thing to remark,
That flowing beards are all the go way up in Ironbark.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAExpect to see more of this last gentleman, he’s a real hoot! :-)

Glyphosate + Wheat linked to gluten intolerance, celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome

eremophila:

Considering the massive increase in people’s intolerances, this seems as good a place to look as any.

Originally posted on GMO Awareness:

Gluten Wheat Glyphosate RoundUp GMO

New evidence points to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s RoundUp weedkiller, as the culprit in the rise of gluten intolerance, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

No, this isn’t coming from Monsanto’s test plots of wheat genetically engineered to resist RoundUp (yet). This is coming from a standard practice used on the vast majority of non-organic wheat grown in the United States and other countries…

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A little adventuring – Part 2

One of the mid-north towns we stopped at on the trip was Wirrabara.  It’s a favourite little town of mine, mostly because it has a great produce market once a month – and I timed the visit to co-incide with one.  Sorry, didn’t take any photos of the market, as I was too busy catching up with old friends, and buying yummy food :-)

The following morning though, I took a quiet walk around the town, and on a Monday morning in winter, it was very quiet.  The locals I did see, were friendly in their greetings.  There’s a saying in South Australia, that the further north one travels, the friendlier the people get, and I have to agree that its been my experience also.  Perhaps it’s to do with the climate – further south where its colder, people tend to stay in the their homes more…….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The town park is well set up for visitors, with toilets, and shelters and BBQ facilities.  A lovely creek flows through it in winter, and there are plenty of frogs and birds to listen to.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis mural in the park was constructed as part of the Centenary of Federation Celebrations.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne of the pieces of playground equipment.  :-)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMany towns have paintings on the electricity poles, and the theme for this one appears to be birds.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis area was very important in the States early history.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis church was built during the Great Depression, which I think quite an incredible effort.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt’s obvious it’s a farming area.  During last summer, bush fires came very close to the town, and it was a very concerning time for all.  Thankfully, it survived.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe local craft shop is well worth a visit, with a wide selection of local produce, such as jams and honey etc, and woollen garments, fleeces, timber carvings, and stunning fibre work by a local artist.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the site of the monthly market, and the verandah and decking is a recent addition.  The market is a real meeting place, and great tea, coffee and cakes make it a perfect place to catch up.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARoses roses and roses were everywhere, and really enjoying the season.  Yes, it’s midwinter and the roses are in full leaf and bloom!

For more on the history of this area, please follow this link.

 

The little adventuring – Part 1

Three years ago I left the area I loved and moved from the Mid-North of South Australia to the Lower South East.  It was for the sake of my health, as the farming chemicals in the area were dramatically adversely affecting my daily life.  Coastal life held some reprive…..  and so I became an environmental refugee.  My heart has always remained in the North; no matter how much I tried to love this area, it never really spoke to me in the way that the north does, and in particular, the Flinder’s Ranges.  If there’s a place on this Earth that I feel at home, it is in the Flinders.

So I resolved to take a journey back, to see if it really was how I still felt, or if I was simply in love with the notion, and not the reality.  I was also looking forward to catching up with old friends.  A new friend from this area, and also relatively new to Australia, accompanied me on this trip, while Fred and the cats went into boarding.  Merriwether stayed at home, keeping the grass mowed.  The plan was to be away for about 10 days, with three days at Melrose, at the base of Mt. Remarkable, Southern Flinders Ranges.  It was a flexible timetable, to allow for happenstance, which incidently, did happen :-)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is what I travelled hundreds of kilometers to see - Mt. Remarkable.  It really is quite amazing how it suddenly appears out of the plain.  All 960 metres of it.  For one who now lives at virtual sea level, it’s balm for the soul.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA While surfing the net for somewhere to stay, I came across Kookaburra Creek Bush Retreat, and thought it seemed worth a try.  So very glad I did!  Initially we booked in for three nights, then added an extra night for good measure.  The bus was within my budget, and it was great!  It bit like camping with an outdoor kitchen, but with more comfort for sleeping on cold nights.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASweet and simply furnished, it fulfilled its role wonderfully.

I’ll write more about the Retreat in another post, as there’s far too much to talk about in this one, to do it full justice, but here’s a few bits to whet your appetite.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHere’s a couple of locals, enjoying the peaceful surroundings.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOnly in Australia out bush would you be likely to see a notice like this :-)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere are many old trucks strategically placed around the large property and yes, I took many many pictures of them.   Wallace the Blue Heeler, is resident guide dog, and takes all new visitors for a walk around the grounds.  Although still quite young, he was very well mannered and a real pleasure to have the company of.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy companion also loved taking plenty of pictures of the trucks.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA late afternoon view of the Northern Flinders Ranges.  I spent a decade living in them…. a long time ago….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAReturning to the Mount at sunset, after a day out at Quorn.

Overall, we were very lucky with the weather, it being mid-winter Downunder, as rain didn’t dampen too many days.  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

One morning I rose before the sun and climbed up high to catch the sun as it rose over the tree tops.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOn this morning, the golden light was wonderful as were the birds singing to it. No crowds here to spoil it.

Of course, there were many other places and people I saw along the way, all of it memorable.  More on it later… I hear rumblings approaching from yet another storm – winter is well and truly arrived!

 

Do we exaggerate the dangers of conventional fabrics?

eremophila:

Dangers are not exaggerated. If anything, humans underestimate the damage being done to themselves and their environment.

Originally posted on O ECOTEXTILES:

We received a comment on one of our blog posts recently in which the reader chastised us for exaggerating issues which they believe are disproportionate to the facts. In their words: For instance formaldehyde… is a volatile chemical…no doubt it is used in the textile industry a great deal…but looking for this chemical in end products is an example chasing a ghost…. It has to be put in perspective. I do not know of any citation that a human developed cancer because they wore durable press finished clothing.

Please follow along as I itemize the reasons that we don’t feel the issues are exaggerated.

Textiles are full of chemicals. The chemicals found in fabrics have been deemed to be, even by conservative organizations such as the Swedish government, simply doing us no good – and even harming us in ways ranging from subtle to profound. But fabrics are just one…

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Stormy times

I have returned from my adventures, just in time to experience storms in my local area – storms that are travelling across most of South East Australia.   It seems somewhat reflective of my state of mind…..

I had a great time overall, took many pictures, did lots of exploring, all of which will be revealed later.  So far, I’ve not downloaded the images….

It’s not easy settling into life at sea level again.  Hmm….  not sure at this stage which is the best solution to that……

My four-legged family seem pleased to have me back again, although Fred may miss the extra attention he got on his other holiday.  It’s certainly  the weather to have a cat curled up on one’s lap :-)  and they are loving the warm hearth at night :-)